White Wigwam - Ground/Trigger
2 days ago, 23 July 2014  ·   1 note

There is a quality to live music that often is lacking from bedroom or studio recordings. The slow, meandering build up, in anticipation of the climax (or anticlimax), the getting-lost-in-music, and the consensual surrender to the sonic mind-alteration. White Wigwam is a Prague-based musician, affiliated through various projects with the collective and label KLaNGundKRaCH. Remaining in the fringes of Prague’s experimental scene by choice, the group, even though favouring the anonymity of the collective spirit, has produced a number of intriguing projects and personalities over the years of its existence. No Pavarotti, Rouilleux, Core of the Coalman or Sister Body, just to name a few. 

White Wigwam, remains one of the more mysterious projects of the collective. Sonically, it revels in droney, psychotropic passages, coated in opiated atmospheres and dark alleyways with forlorn melodies appearing from the rhythmical structures. Ground/Trigger is a limited edition tape release, out on the blog/imprint Red For Colour Blind and the aforementioned KK. Sourced from a live recording - all of the releases on his bandcamp are live recordings, actually - with this one made at the Cross Club in Prague in Spring of this year, it is a collection of three recordings, best listened to continuously. 

Reblog   Like


Souvenir de Tanger - Souvenir II
1 week ago, 17 July 2014  ·   2 notes

image

As Muslimgauze's magnum opus gets re-released and re-listened by a new generation of listeners, and his numerous epigons emerge and disappear, the merging of Oriental tropes in Western electronic music doesn't seem to cease to interest up-and-coming producers in occidental bedrooms. Many question the earnestness of the ventures of the likes of Vatican Shadow, but this discussion, we rather skip here.

Souvenir de Tanger is a project by a Warsaw-based producer who cut his teeth in various bands and first started experimenting with electronic music in a new wave outfit. How did his current project come about? “The name Souvenir de Tanger came from a postcard that I bought in Morocco, in Tangier. The postcard was kitschy in a camp aesthetic. When I started to make this project I was really interested in the connection between European, the Middle East and Muslim cultures, and this postcard became a symbol for it,” he says.

His raison dêtre came with the Arab Spring that shook the world in 2010/2011.  ”When I started making music, it was the time of the Arab Spring and the first track on the EP is inspired by the guy who burnt himself in Tunisia, which spawned the whole revolution in the Arab World.” 

His Souvenir II tape follows in the wake of the first part and is released by the BDTA  label on tape. The almost virtual or virtualised images of online and TV broadcasts conveying the happenings in the Middle East processed somewhere in Central Europe, detached but still caring and interested. He doesn’t deny the inspiration by Muslimgauze. To the contrary, he admits a literal borrowing of his method. “He [Muslimgauze] started music because of the political situation in the Middle East, and I was in the same situation. Most of the post-Muslimgauze projects are experimenting with the melodies, but they don’t connect themselves to the political situation in the Middle East.” 

Reblog   Like


Gavrilov princip’s hometaping experiments
2 weeks ago, 9 July 2014  ·   0 notes

image

Our shadows will be roaming through Vienna,
wandering through the courts, frightening the lords.

(Princip’s prison cell inscription immortalized in a Belgrade graffiti)

On 28. June 2014 a hundred years have passed since the Sarajevo assassination, an event which ignited a sequence of international reactions which will lead to First World War and ultimately mark the downfall of the Habsburg dynasty. An apt occasion then to present a release which commemorates the man who pulled the trigger on the tottering dinosaur of imperialism in Central Europe.

Claimed by leftists and nationalists alike, Gavrilo Princip is hard to classify by today’s criteria. He was Yugoslav nationalist who believed in national unity, the organic bond of language and blood and their progressive role which drives the world forwards[1], but in the same time he was also a liberationist, an anti-authoritarian figure who drew heavily from the anarchist tradition. From his standpoint, nationalist and liberationist ideas were not in necessary collision and, like many of his comrades from Mlada Bosna, he often oscillated between right-wing and left-wing politics in a way which may appear strange today.

But rather then to further dwell upon matters resolved by serious historians 40 years ago (blissfully unaware of the forthcoming revisionist frenzies within the various micro-contexts of post-communist Eastern Europe), we propose a much more interesting alternative – a détournement.

image

Poseta (Serbian for “Visitation”) is a 1998 self-released cassette of a short-lived hometaping group Gavrilov princip active in Kragujevac (Serbia, then part of rump FR Yugoslavia, successor state of SFRY) from 1993 to 1999.

Gavrilov princip (Serbian for “Gavrilo’s principle”, a pun on the name of Gavrilo Princip) was a joint collaborative effort of Miodrag Saramandić from Aranđelovac (Serbia), a local demo veteran and instigator of a few DIY bands which remained unbeknown to majority of alternative music publics in Serbia, and Predrag Petrović alias Phantom, a legend of the Yugoslav hometaping network from Kragujevac (Serbia) responsible for a host of DIY experimental music projects like Fast Deadboy[2] (1983-1993, 1995-), Rubbishmen alternative jazz (1984-1986) and Phantom (circa 1995), DIY punk/experimental labels such as Dead Tapes and Phantom Tapes as well as fanzines like Instant gladna igra (Serbian for “Quick hungry game”), Phantom and Larynx of the Fast Deadboy, etc.

Read More

Reblog   Like


Hlukár / hLukáš SPLIT
3 weeks ago, 4 July 2014  ·   3 notes

Hovering on the fringes of Slovak experimental music, the Noize Konspiracy collective remains uncompromising in their ethos and works. The punks of the noise scene, kind of. “The whole idea for the release came about, when I staggered around the Fuga Club in Bratislava and Lukáš [from Noize Konspiracy] told me he is Hlukas and I am Hlukár, so we should do something together. We decided that each of us will get one side of the tape and will do a ‘remix’ and include our own stuff,” says Hlukár.

Hlukár comes from Rožňava, a small town in eastern Slovakia, one of these local Twin Peaks versions, a zone of nothingness that is also a wonderful source of inspiration resulting in creations laced with a certain nihilistic flair. His split sidekick, Lukáš, is from Noize Konspiracy, the aforementioned subterranean collective.

The split is veiled in noisy darkness, but also offers a respite in the form of various ironic samples - sourced from random instruction tapes and sonic ephemera. Kicking off steadily with a 38-minute monster of a track is Hlukár. Apparently, he made the whole thing using solely the Elektrosluch instrument, created by the Bratislava-based sound artist Jonáš Gruska, since all of his other gear got stolen. A characteristically noisy and rhythmical ride ensues, hypnotic and spiced up with samples about religious freaks.

Lukáš’, based in the capital Bratislava, side is more mellow and ominous, but before all of this a blissfully inapt saccharine start off with a sample about boosting your business. It also includes some distant flickers of light on tracks like “Rajda”. Trippy slabs of noise appear and reappear, tweaks and knob-twisting, mangled samples with quotes like “Don’t be the message. Be the messenger.” The medium is the message this time - in a meta way and literally - the tape, aides the lo-fi nature of the content and the intent, though you still can download it - digitally - here as well.

Reblog   Like


Bűkko Tapes: Eastern European electronic alternative for your tapedeck
3 weeks ago, 30 June 2014  ·   5 notes

Brno, the second city of Czech Republic, has seen a gradual upsurge in underground sonic activities, aided by its ample student populace - both at the art and technical universities - resulting in a very interesting mix where art and technology come to each other’s service. The crew behind the DIY Arduino-based instrument Standuino is based there, now busy with the increasingly successful Bastl Instruments, who, coincidentally, also lent its support to the latest Brno electronic export - the label Bukko Tapes. Here, its owner and artist Leoš Hort, says more.

When and why was the label established?

Bűkko Tapes was founded this spring by me and with support of Bastl-Instruments. The idea is to create a platform for unsigned talented artists. It all comes from my experience of being an unknown bedroom producer. When you are producing music, and just uploading it to some music-sharing online destinations without any background, there are just friends listening to your stuff, and its really hard to pass your creations to wider audience. 

There is a certain sound that’s already obvious from the three releases on the Bandcamp, beat-driven, a lot of is 4-4 oriented. Can you tell us about the sonic direction of the label?

With Bűkko Tapes I have an idea, which I’m trying to follow. So the keywords would be: analogue techno, house, generative music, experimental dance music.. But it doesn´t mean that doors are closed for everything else. I’m opened to all sorts of stuff. But it just has to fit in there somehow. I’m also looking for some drone/ambient releases for future.

"Eastern European electronic alternative for your tapedeck," is how you describe the label. Does it mean you are geographically specific in your selection? 

Yes, i want to focus just for Eastern Europe. Because i know that this region has lots of great musicians who have lot to offer and are being totally unknown at the same time. I think that Eastern Europe is currently the best place to “fish” for new original music. When it comes to the selection itself, the main thing are always the recordings, but I’m also interested in the processes behind it, like live performing, materials or equipment used, etc.

Can you tell us something about each of the releases?

The first release, called Hrtl - Hydroxid, is an acid/dub-techno recording that I made with my solo project. It´s all recorded live with hardware synthesisers and then just polished in studio, but still kept raw and straight forward, as much as the improvised live sessions I perform as Hrtl.

The second recording is ALUPHOBIA - REVIVAL. It’s the work of the great young producer and sound-engineer Barnabas Kiss based in Hungary. It’s hard to correctly describe the genre, but you can sense pieces of house, downtempo or chillwave there. It has its own specific sound, because Aluphobia uses plenty of noises and dynamic processing to build his very own atmosphere. Working with various software platforms, and his very advanced sound-processing skills he created my most favourite recording of this year. Im very happy we have him in Bűkko.

Last comes Finfriju - Seeds. It’s a bit more complicated with this one, because the author is kept secret. And when it comes to recording, it doesn’t get any simpler. Seeds is not really a recording, its a piece of software generating that music. And since every rendering is unique, it’s impossible to specify the original. So it made me create a limited edition of numbered cassettes, containing very unique renders on each side of cassette. In fact it means that there are no duplicated tapes and every cassette has its own original audio. Online you can listen to one render which you can´t get on any of released cassettes. The author used a textcode-based sound generating software called SuperCollider, which is used amongst sound experimenting artists for creating random noises, drones and different kinds of sound effects. But Finfriju took this platform to create something more “songish”.

You are based in Brno. Can you tell us about its underground music scene as it is at the moment?

Brno is blooming like a flower now. Really, over past three years I can see young guys full of enthusiasm getting into music. For all I have to point out guys like Tom Holič, Krysí Krys, Chef3000, Misisbe Sisbert. This is the main core of hardware-based “four to the floor” electronic here in Brno.

On the other hand, there´s pretty active scene around art exhibitions and faculty of fine arts in Brno, making space for more unconventional music styles like noise/drone/ambient/experimental. For all Michael Jackson Pollock, is going to blow your mind live with their heavy-metal poses during one button solo on DIY bleep synth. A must see!

Reblog   Like